Our campaign principles

REPAIRING THE HARM

The Seattle we are building will have a home for every person. We will reverse the historical effects of redlining and racial disparities in education funding, life expectancy, and wealth. I will propose an education committee comprised of educators, councilmembers, school board members, and community leaders. This committee will address discipline disparities and the school-to-prison pipeline and actively respond to the needs of our diverse district. I will push for meaningful investment to expand and fully fund before and after-school childcare and health services in public schools.

DEMOCRATIZING WEALTH, POWER, AND RESOURCES

Our neighborhoods belong to us, and they aren’t for sale. As a city councilmember, I will vigorously oppose the sale of our community’s land to the highest bidder and will expand the creation of community land trusts. District 2 needs more childcare options, permanently affordable housing, and more parks (without displacement).

Private banks serve private interests. If we are serious about creating a future with shared prosperity, we need a public bank in Seattle to keep local dollars invested in local priorities – like closing the massive racial wealth gap in our city and treating the root causes of homelessness. I will fight to fix our upside-down tax code with progressive taxation to fund the needs of our growing city because relying on property and sales tax to fund everything just doesn’t work for our poor neighbors.

Planning for the seventh generation

We are facing an existential climate threat and we will have to rise to meet this challenge. I will work with frontline communities to implement the recently-passed Green New Deal resolution. This is an ambitious, broad-scope effort that includes 100% public utilities, free and expanded public transit, and green union-wage jobs right here in District 2. The market has not proposed any solutions. We must build a regenerative economy that leaves nobody behind, and proactively protects the people of our city from a destabilizing climate.

OUR VISION FOR SEATTLE

 repairing the harm

EQUITABLE FUTURE FOR OUR KIDS

Seattle has seen an explosion of growth, bringing in a lot of folks who want to make Seattle their home. However, the growth was not managed equitably. Wealth has been concentrated in certain neighborhoods, while schools, childcare, and other services in lower income neighborhoods are not funded. Inequities in education outcomes, preschool enrollment and quality childcare keep poor students and students of color from realizing their full potential and add to racial disparities in outcomes. I will work to bridge the investment gap in the south end and Chinatown/ International District while making sure working families continue to live in their communities.

Black students are suspended at four times the rate of white students in our public schools. The disparity in discipline starts as early as preschool. Black kids are not seen as kids and dehumanized from a very young age. We will expand the Black Lives Matter in Schools program to make it year round. We will develop a plan with BLM at Schools to train teachers on anti-racist disciplinary practices, decolonize public school curriculums, and put an end to suspensions and expulsions which keep students away from learning.

Schools must be safe and welcoming spaces for all our students irrespective of their gender identity, sexual orientation, housing situation, or immigration status. We will work with the school board to implement strong anti-bullying guidelines, provide free tampons and pads in school restrooms, expand staff training to protect queer and trans students, and train teachers on how to protect their immigrant students from ICE.

Seattle public schools have the biggest outcome gap between black and white students in WA state. Pouring more money into a system that does not distribute resources equitably will only widen the gap. Our current system of funding public schools is failing and leaving our kids in a cycle of poverty. I will work with the state for a need based funding of schools focused on repairing historical harms. 

To attract experienced teachers, we need to offer them competitive salaries. We must fully fund all our schools so teachers don’t have to spend their salaries on school supplies. We will stand with our teachers unions in their constitutional right to collectively bargain for fair contracts.

When parents are struggling to pay for school lunches, punishing and shaming students causes increased stress to families. We will fight to eliminate school lunch and invest in universally free public school lunches.

Most of Seattle public schools have in-school childcare, but they are not available to all students because of capacity and cost barriers. We will invest in universal in-school childcare programs, and partner with Parks and Recreation for outdoor before and after-school recreational and community service programs. We will also invest in affordable round the clock public childcare for parents with irregular work schedules. There is no market solution for affordable, quality, for-profit childcare that meets the diverse needs of working families and pays a living wage to childcare workers. We must invest in public solutions and create good paying union jobs in our communities.

Seattle’s public preschool program is a great first step in providing a public preschool option for our families. We will expand the preschool program to all families, and invest in students with special needs. 

                 repairing the harm

SEATTLE GREEN NEW DEAL

We are in the middle of a climate crisis, and our solutions must respond to the scale and urgency of the crisis to prevent resource wars and climate displacement. Because of existing race hierarchies and white supremacy, the effects of climate change disproportionately affect low income families and communities of color. Environmental and racial justice are inextricably linked. This is why I wholeheartedly support a Seattle Green New Deal with a just transition and co-creation with low income families and communities of color.

With the destruction of vast swathes of the Amazon rainforest (earth’s lungs), the time we have to transition to 100% green energy has been reduced. Despite having the evidence that climate change is real and is caused by our reliance on fossil fuels, we have seen no interest from private utility companies in shifting to green energy production. Considering the short timeline and the need for a transition that doesn’t put the cost of the transition on low income consumers, we need to democratize our energy futures. This is why I support publicly-owned utilities,as modeled by the city of Tacoma.

We need to rapidly transition to 100% green energy production. I will propose putting an end to building any new fossil fuel infrastructure in Seattle, including gas hookups to new construction. Heating, cooling, and powering buildings accounted for more than one-third of Seattle’s greenhouse gas emissions in 2016. We will work with the state and county to invest in equitable strategies to increase building energy efficiencies while making sure that low income families and renters are not bearing the cost of transition.

Climate change will not only impact crops, but also meat production, watersheds, fisheries, and other fundamental aspects of our food supply. A lot of the harm done to our planet is irreversible and we will have to develop local food production networks to ensure democratic control over food sources. I will propose investment in community food production and partner with other supporters of Green New Deal on the council to explore potential locations on public property where urban agriculture and gardening may be possible.

Road transportation made up about 62 percent of Seattle’s core emissions in 2016. We have to invest in green transit and transportation infrastructure, but it must start by making public transit free, reliable, and widely accessible. I will work to expand transportation options including connected infrastructure for biking, walking and rolling to provide viable alternatives to driving.

A lot of neighborhoods in District 2 are at high risk of displacement a problem that will be exacerbated by transitioning to green infrastructure if we do not put in place strong anti-displacement strategies. I will work with frontline community organizations to implement a comprehensive anti-displacement plan including, rent control and job training assistance so existing residents can benefit from housing stock weatherization, green jobs, and other infrastructural improvements.

A transition away from an extractive economy to a green regenerative economy offers opportunities to create green jobs. With a Seattle Green New Deal, we will create union jobs in manufacturing, construction, and maintenance right here in our communities. 

As the global climate warms, Seattle faces potential risks associated with increased frequency, timing, and severity of extreme weather events. We will invest in community led climate preparedness and emergency management. I will also push for requiring climate impact planning in all infrastructure projects during project design, construction, and long-term maintenance. Additionally, I will introduce legislation that invests in protection and restoration of natural ecosystems which provide vital barriers against extreme weather events.

I will propose the creation of a public bank to invest in neighborhoods that were labeled “risky” during redlining. Such investments may include, but are not limited to, cultural institutions, infrastructure, housing, job training, transit, and education. We will  work with regional and state partners to fully fund the Duwamish River cleanup ( a designated super-fund site due to excessive pollution) and improve community health against pollution in the south end.

      democratizing wealth, power, and resources

ADDRESSING COMMUNITY SAFETY

Communities cannot thrive or enjoy good health unless they are safe. Violence and fear of violence increase the risk of poor health outcomes and also undermine the community supports and conditions that would otherwise promote health and wellbeing. For too long, community safety was understood and approached largely as a criminal justice issue, without attention to the underlying causes of violence. Data show us that the safest communities are not the ones with the most police, but those with most resources. We will invest in District 2 and make our communities safe for everyone.

 

The circumstances that give rise to violence are also made worse by violence, feeding a cycle of poor community health. I will work with community-led groups like Choose 180, which has up to 87% non-recidivism rate, to fund violence intervention and felony diversion. 

 

 

 

Despite having no gun stores in District 2, guns are easily accessible. Seattle recently passed some rigorous gun storage laws. We should also pass a gun tracing policy to help identify where guns come from and assist responsible gun owners in retrieving lost guns. While these laws will help combat the black market for stolen guns, the issue of gun violence goes deeper than that. To reduce violence, we should acknowledge the public health issue and support a community-based approach to reducing gun homicides and suicides at the local levels. I will also support state and federal efforts to ban assault weapons and expand background checks.

 

 

 

Structural drivers of violence set the stage for unsafe communities. A lack of local jobs is a risk factor for violence, and violence, in turn, is used as an excuse to not invest in our communities, making jobs even scarcer. In the absence of grassroots momentum toward solutions, violence continues unchecked. I will not only address the symptoms of inequality but also address the causes. I will work with partners at the port, in labor unions, and in community-based non-profits to create good-paying jobs for young people in our communities. This includes trade apprenticeship programs, lobbying for expanded lifestyle and skills curriculum (metal shop, woodworking, computer programming) in our public schools, and cracking down on unpaid internships that offer no skills training. 

 

I have always been proud of the diversity and love in our neighborhoods. Even though we don’t have control over federal immigration policy, we can take steps to live up to our status as a sanctuary city. ICE and other immigration agencies take advantage of immigrants not knowing their rights. We will invest in community workshops in District 2 to provide information in the languages that our communities need. In addition, I will partner with civil rights organizations, like the ACLU, to create programs that keep our immigrant neighbors safe.

White supremacy is not a new problem. Every few years it rears its ugly head. We must not only address the daily acts of violence and terror committed by groups like Patriot Prayer, but we must also unite the working class in our fight against the corporate power brokers that seek to divide us. I will work with CAIR – WA and other advocacy groups in Seattle to propose anti-hate crime legislation and use principles of restorative justice to heal our communities.

 

There are currently approximately 120 Safe consumption sites operating in 12 countries around the world. Over 100 evidence-based, peer-reviewed studies have consistently proven the positive impacts of supervised consumption services including

  • Increasing entry into drug treatment. 
  • Reducing the frequencies of overdose
  • Reducing public injection and public disorder
  • Saving costs due to a reduction in disease, overdose deaths, and the need for emergency medical services

 

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Safe consumption sites are an effective harm reduction strategy.

While we acknowledge that our police don’t have an easy job, we must call out instances of police brutality that only serve to erode the public’s trust in law enforcement. People of color fear for their lives if they call 911. That is the reality of the relationship between some communities and our police department. I will work with my colleagues on the council and the Community Police Commission (CPC) to give the CPC the tools it needs to effectively advocate for our communities.

            democratizing wealth, power, and resources

FINDING PROGRESSIVE REVENUE

If we are serious about creating a future with shared prosperity, we need a public bank in Seattle to keep local dollars invested in local priorities – like closing the massive racial wealth gap in our city. I will also fight to fix our upside-down tax code and fund the needs of our growing city with progressive taxation because relying on property and sales tax to fund everything just doesn’t work for our neighbors.

Full platform to be released on September 24th, 2019

                      democratizing wealth, power, and resources

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

We are in the middle of a climate crisis, and our solutions must respond to the scale and urgency of the crisis to prevent resource wars and climate displacement. Because of existing race hierarchies and white supremacy, the effects of climate change disproportionately affect low income families and communities of color. Environmental and racial justice are inextricably linked. This is why I wholeheartedly support a Seattle Green New Deal with a just transition and co-creation with low income families and communities of color.

Full platform to be released on October 1st, 2019

          planning for the seventh generation

BUILDING COMMUNITY WEALTH

Our neighborhoods belong to us, and they aren’t for sale. As a city councilmember, I will vigorously oppose the sale of our community’s land to the highest bidder and will expand the creation of community land trusts, so communities have a say in how our neighborhoods grow.

Full platform to be released on October 8th, 2019

                    planning for the seventh generation

EFFECTIVE GOVERNANCE

The Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce has already spent over a million dollars in our local elections. It is no surprise that we can find money to give corporations large tax breaks, yet we never have money for affordable housing, clean drinking water, and fixing our sidewalks. We must take back our democracy by moving to public financing of elections. 

Full platform to be released on October 15th, 2019